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Biomarker and drug for brain cancer found

04 September 2012 | News | By BioSpectrum Bureau

A*STAR discovers drug for brain cancer

Biomarker (miR-138) and a potential drug (antimiR-138) for brain tumor found

Biomarker (miR-138) and a potential drug (antimiR-138) for brain tumor found

Singapore: A*STAR scientists have identified a biomarker of the most lethal form of brain tumours in adults, glioblastoma multiforme. The scientists found that by targeting this biomarker and depleting it with a potential drug, they were able to prevent the progression and relapse of the brain tumour.

This research was conducted by scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology led by Dr Prabha Sampath, principal investigator, in collaboration with A*STAR's Bioinformatics Institute (BII), and clinical collaborators from Medical University of Graz, Austria, and National University of Singapore. The research findings were published on in the scientific journal, Cell Reports from Cell Press.

The scientists found that the biomarker, miR-138, is highly expressed in cancer stem cells as compared to normal neural stem cells. They thus carried out in vitro experiments to deplete miR-138 in these cancer stem cells with a potential drug, antimiR-138, to observe the effect. They found that when miR-138 is depleted, completely destroyed the cancer cells. This is an important breakthrough as current therapies such as gamma radiation and surgical methods proved to be inadequate in treating these brain tumours, which tend to re-grow from cancer stem cells and become extremely lethal.

Dr Sampath said, "In this study we have identified a master regulator, miR-138, which is essential for the progression and relapse of a deadly form of brain cancer. By targeting this regulator we can effectively prevent the recurrence of this lethal form of cancer. This promising finding will pave the way for the development of a novel therapy to successfully treat the aggressive forms of brain cancer."

Studies were also done in mice to determine whether antimiR-138 could effectively inhibit the growth of tumours. These experiments were conducted with a control drug as well, revealing that tumours continued to be present when mice were injected with the control, while injection with the antimiR-138 showed no tumour growth after nine months.

 

 

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